The alarming dropout rate for Aboriginal people in Quebec: CD Howe Institute

TORONTO, April 28 / CNW / - The poverty of Quebec's Indigenous population is extreme, and the deep divide between the education level of Indigenous people and non-Indigenous people is the main cause, according to a report from the CD Howe Institute.

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TORONTO, April 28 / CNW / - The poverty of Quebec's Indigenous population is extreme, and the deep divide between the education level of Indigenous people and non-Indigenous people is the main cause, according to a report from the CD Howe Institute. In his work entitled Indigenous Education in Quebec: A Comparative Analysis ExerciseJohn Richards, a professor at Simon Fraser University in Vancouver, examines the relationship between education and employment levels among Aboriginal people in Quebec. By comparing the educational outcomes within Indigenous identity groups with the outcomes obtained by other Quebecers, and Canadians as a whole, Richards concludes that the educational outcomes of Indigenous people in the province are below the national average, which is itself dramatically low. Richards presents six far-reaching recommendations for resolving the education crisis among Indigenous people in Quebec as in the rest of Canada.

Professor Richards, who holds the Roger Phillips Chair in Social Policy at the CD Howe Institute, observes that the overall dropout rate of Indigenous Quebecers aged 20 to 24 is 43 %, surpassing that of non-Quebecers by 28 points. Aboriginals, and by 3 points that of Aboriginals in the rest of Canada. Among the six provinces with more than 100,000 Aboriginal people, Quebec is ranked third in high school dropout: behind Manitoba and Saskatchewan, but ahead of Alberta, Ontario and British Columbia. In Quebec, the median income of Aboriginals in 2005 was two-thirds of the income of non-Aboriginals, and that of the Inuit was less than three-fifths of the income of non-Aboriginals.

This publication is available here: http://www.cdhowe.org/pdf/Commentary_328_en.pdf

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