ADVERTISEMENT

The role of ICT in transdisciplinary learning

In recent years, the Quebec education system has embarked on a major transformation of its organization and its study programs at the elementary, secondary and college levels. In this regard, the vision, mission and values of the Quebec school system have been redefined. With the pedagogical integration of ICT in schools, the ways in which students' knowledge is acquired and the pedagogical practices of teachers are being redesigned.

Published on :

Posted in:
READ THIS ARTICLE IN:

ATTENTION! The English translation is automated - Errors (sometimes hilarious!) can creep in! ;)

Mark as favorite (0)

Over the past few years, the Quebec education system has embarked on a major transformation of its organization and its study programs at the elementary, secondary and college levels (Conseil Supérieur de l'Education du Québec, 2000) . In this regard, the vision, mission and values of the Quebec school system have been redefined. With the pedagogical integration of ICT in schools, the ways in which students' knowledge is acquired and the pedagogical practices of teachers are redesigned.

“The school must become the place of construction of another knowledge, which means, among other things, to sensitize and train the young person to learn about the project, entrepreneurship, the construction of the individual, by having recourse to new technologies to be in line with a complex environment in which the intensive use of information technologies is widespread. "
(Laberge, 2003, p.8).

By considering ICT as transdisciplinary learning tools, it is essential to define the concept of transdisciplinarity. As the prefix “trans” indicates, transdisciplinarity presupposes a movement from one discipline to another, to intersect and transcend them. With the reform of education in Quebec, the emergence of ICT in education favors a reframing of disciplinary learning in a broader and decompartmentalized dimension.

“The Training Program aims to develop skills that call on knowledge from various sources and that does not necessarily respond to a disciplinary logic. Also, the school is invited to go beyond the silos between disciplines in order to help the pupil to better understand and integrate the links between his various learning experiences. "
(Quebec school training program, 2001, p.5).

For Tardif (1998), the use of ICT by teachers promotes the development of concrete links between the different school subjects. As demonstrated by a five-year New Zealand study of three cohorts of high school students, the use of computers appears to have contributed, along with other innovative educational means, to increasing student learning in English, math and science (Mckinnon, Nolan & Sinclair, 1996).

Considering ICT as a transdisciplinary tool requires teachers to review their teaching practices. In this regard, they must develop learning activities that allow their students to explicitly create links with other learning, other disciplines and other contexts of everyday life. With the use of new technologies, students will be able to transfer their new learning and generalize it to any relevant context. Thus, they will learn to use what they have learned to structure their thinking, open up to new horizons and become an independent learner. Developing learner autonomy is essential in the current context of our society. With the help of ICT, the student becomes master of his learning and able to educate himself.

“The educational methods are proposed by the teacher and supported by ICT but it is up to the learner to educate himself… fertile ground for awakening, exercising and developing skills. "
(Laberge, 2003, p.6-7).

Recognizing that ICTs promote open-mindedness, it also seems interesting to draw a parallel with article 14 of the Charter of transdisciplinarity adopted at the First World Congress of Transdisciplinarity, “Convento da Arrabida” in Portugal in November 1994: " Rigor, openness and tolerance are the fundamental characteristics of the transdisciplinary attitude and vision. »(Nicolescu, de Freitas, Morin, 2002. p. 8, 9).

The contribution of ICT in teaching and learning situations should not constitute a revolution, but progress favoring the acquisition of new learning. It is only in the presence of favorable conditions of access and use that new technologies will be able to provide substantial learning gains for students (Laferrière, Breuleux and Bracewell, 1999). According to the Quebec firm of educational consultants "Discas", ICTs must not categorically eliminate current non-technological educational practices, nor eclipse the human, documentary or other resources already available to the student to carry out his learning. In short, it is more a question of amalgamating different learning methods to promote students' academic success.

By Hélène Archambault, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor, Faculty of Education, Collège universitaire de Saint-Boniface, Winnipeg, (Manitoba)

===
Bibliographical references

Higher Education Council. (2000a). Education and new technologies. For successful integration into teaching and learning. Annual report 1999-2000 on the state and needs of education. Quebec: Government of Quebec.

Discas, Firm of educational consultants (1987). The framework for integrating ICT into the curriculum (section 3). Electronic document accessible from the URL: http // www.discas.ca / Cadreref / TIC / TICconditions.html.

Government of Quebec (2001b. Quebec school training program. Preschool and primary education. Quebec: Ministry of Education.

Laberge, M.-F. (2003). Our students are entering the digital age. Pedagogical life, March 2003.

Laferrière, T., Breuleux, A., Bracewell, R. (1999). Advantage of information and communication technologies (ICT) for teaching and learning in kindergarten through high school grades. Study prepared for SchoolNet Industry Canada. Electronic document accessible at the URL: http // www.schoolnet.ca / snab / f / documents_de_discussion / pedagbenefitsSep28FR.pdf

Mckinnon, DH, Nolan, CJP, Sinclair, KE (1996). The Freyberg Integrated Studies Project in New Zealand: A longitudinal Study of Secondary Students' Attitudes Toward Computers, Their Motivation and Performance. See above International Conferences on Technology and Education, p. 463-465

Nicolescu, B., de Freitas, L., Morin, E. (2002). Charter of Transdisciplinarity. Electronic document accessible from the URL: http://basarab.nicolescu.perso.sfr.fr/ciret/chartfr.htm

Tardif, J. (1998). Integrate new information technologies - What educational framework? Paris: ESF editor.

Your comments about this article

To comment this article and add your ideas, we invite you to follow us on social networks. All articles are published there and it is also possible to comment directly on Facebook, Twitter or LinkedIn.

Do you have news to share with us or would you like to publish a testimonial?

Publicize your educational project or share your ideas via our Opinion, Testimonials or Press Releases sections! Here's how to do it!

Do you like what you read?

Subscribe and receive the next 3 issues of École branchée magazine (print or digital, French or English) in addition to our exclusive online files!

Learn more >

About the Author

École branchée
École branchée
The École branchée, a non-profit organization, is your professional development partner in connection with digital competence in education. We believe that education must be able to benefit from current educational and technological advances to better meet the increasingly diverse needs of learners and promote their success, today and for the rest of their lives. We work there through our professional information services, continuing education and the creation of educational tools.

Receive the Weekly Newsletter

Get our Info #DevProf and l'Hebdo so you don't miss out on anything new at École branchée!





You might also like: