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Young Canadians and Online Privacy

As part of the online Privacy Policy, online promotion survey, conducted among 5,400 students by the Habilomédias organization, we examined the strategies used by young people to control the image of them that emerges from their online presence. , as well as the means used to protect their personal information.

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As part of the survey "Online privacy, online promotion", conducted among 5,400 students by the organization Habilomedia, we examined the strategies used by young people to control the image of them that emerges from their online presence, as well as the means used to protect their personal information.

The first finding is that even the youngest students share a great deal of private information on social media. Fortunately, many employ strategies to protect their privacy: do not share their details, use a false identity, use the privacy settings to block access to strangers, or delete a post or ask someone to delete a publication about them.

However, the study shows that while young people are aware of the need to protect their personal information, their knowledge and understanding of location-based services, privacy policies and password-sharing issues is often limited. In many cases, they do not use all the tools at their disposal to protect their private data.

On the other hand, the results of the study indicate that 68 % of students mistakenly believe that a site setting out a privacy policy will not share their personal information with other parties; more worryingly, 59 % of students would share their networking, email or cell phone password. Girls are much more likely than boys to share their passwords.

In addition, the percentage of students who lie about their age online in order to be able to register for sites reserved for young people older than them goes from 18 % to 4e year at 65 % in 11e year (4e secondary).

Finally, it should be noted that, according to the study, 89 % of students feel that it is not correct for a friend to post a mediocre or embarrassing photo of them. In addition, half consider that it is also wrong to post a photo of them, no matter how good, without first obtaining permission.

In light of the results of this survey, we can see the importance of remaining vigilant and ensuring that our young people use all the tools at their disposal to protect their private information. Their safety and their reputation are at stake.

 

Here is a presentation of the highlights of the study:

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About the Author

Pierre Turbis
Pierre Turbis
Pierre is a journalist and columnist. He contributes to numerous publications.

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