United States: Goodbye cursive writing, hello keyboard skills

At the start of the 2014 school year, new standards will be adopted by the United States for mathematics and English. Modernization requires, we will add mastery of the keyboard at the end of primary to remove that of cursive writing.

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At the start of the 2014 school year, new standards will be adopted by the United States for mathematics and English. Modernization requires, we will add mastery of the keyboard at the end of primary to remove that of cursive writing.

The Associated Press news was reported in many media. It says that it will no longer be necessary to learn cursive writing in elementary school, except in a few states which have chosen to maintain it. This is the case for California, Georgia and Massachusetts. Other states have preferred to leave the choice to school districts or are still studying the issue, but 45 will abandon it.

In addition, within 3 years, the standardized tests should all be administered electronically.

In 2010, the country acquired a series of key skills that guide education, called “national standards” (national standards). It is not a curriculum per se, but a common base of skills that 51 states and territories have agreed to share. They aim to better prepare students for the transition to higher education as well as for the job market.

The Common State Standard Initiative Explain that these standards are inspired by those of the countries whose students perform best to ensure success in a society and a global economy and based on evidence of effectiveness.

The standard for the use of technology for writing is as follows:

Kindergarten to grade 2e year:
With the help and support of an adult, students explore different digital tools to produce and publish writings, including a collaborative component with their peers.

In 3e year:
With the help and support of an adult, the student uses technology to produce and publish writing (developing keyboard skills) as well as to interact and collaborate with others.

In 4e and 5e year:
With a little help and support from an adult, the student uses technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing, and to interact and collaborate with others. They demonstrate sufficient keyboard fluency to produce a minimum of one page in a single shift (“all at once”, ultimately!).

To know more :
Common Core State Standards Initiative - About the Standards

Writing in attached letters, a vestige of the past

California among few states clinging to pen as cursive writing is erased from curriculum

 

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About the Author

Audrey Miller
Audrey Millerhttps://ecolebranchee.com
General manager of École branchée, Audrey holds a graduate degree in educational technologies and a bachelor's degree in public communication. Member of the Order of Excellence in Education of Quebec, she is particularly interested in the professional development of teachers, information in the digital age and media education, while actively creating bridges between the actors of the educational ecosystem since 1999. She is involved these days in particular in Edteq Association and as a member of the ACELF Communications Committee. When she has free time, she is passionate about her children, his rabbits, horses, good wine and... Web programming!

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