New Zealand: a simple curriculum, which allows the autonomy of each school

In 2007, New Zealand completely transformed its education system. At the heart of this reform, a simple curriculum, which trusts the schools. Let's discover this system which caused a lot of talk at the last iPad Summit in Boston. (Second of 3 parts)

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Automated English translation - (sometimes hilarious) mistakes can creep in! ;)

In 2007, New Zealand completely transformed its education system. At the heart of this reform, a simple curriculum, which trusts the schools. Let's discover this system which caused a lot of talk at the last iPad Summit in Boston. (Second of 3 parts)

A teacher by the name of Richard wells came to present his country's education system to the Boston iPad Summit, which took place from November 13 to 15. According to him, this new system is a dream for all teachers who want to prepare their students for the reality of the current century. Let's take a closer look!

(Continued from yesterday ...)

New Zealand is an officially bicultural and bilingual (English and Maori) country. As a result, all students receive a curriculum that includes both Western culture and indigenous Maori culture.

The main lines of the New Zealand curriculum encompass the 1time at the 13e year in a single explanatory document of… 49 pages! In fact, the curriculum infographic fits on one page. Here it is:

Source: New Zealand Ministry of Education

 

The program's vision is to help young people become confident, connected, actively involved and lifelong learners. The curriculum also promotes, among other things, excellence, respect, but also innovation and social participation.

Everything is experienced in 8 fields of learning: English, the arts, physical and health education, learning a second language, mathematics and statistics, science, social sciences and technology.

The whole curriculum is built around 5 skills: thinking (creativity, critical thinking and metacognition), the use of language and symbols, self-management (motivation, entrepreneurship), the relationship with others and participation in the life of the community. They are integrated into each of the learning fields. For example, students need to become proficient in their use of language in English, but also in science and technology. In summary, students who are proficient users of language, symbols, and texts can interpret and use words, numbers, pictures, movements, metaphors, and technologies in a variety of contexts.

To guide teachers in applying this reform, the government has put in place national standards content of the 1time to 8e year in reading, writing and math. These standards are actually statements about what students should know and be able to do in order to meet the requirements of the New Zealand curriculum. For example, a student of 6e grade should be able to apply simple multiplication strategies in different contexts.

New Zealand offers 8 principles aiming to help schools to set up a unique curriculum for each one. These guiding principles are: high expectations, the basics of Treaty of Waitangi, cultural diversity, inclusion, learning to learn, community engagement, coherence and future directions.

Ultimately, the Ministry of Education does not administer a single exam and schools are responsible for setting up the assessments themselves for the certification of students.

 

Technology at the heart of New Zealand's educational project

The use of mobile technology is at the heart of the schools' educational project since it corresponds to one of the 8 fields of learning (English, the arts, physical and health education, learning of 'a second language, mathematics and statistics, science, social sciences and technology).

By "technology", we do not mean the construction of wooden objects, but we guide students to be innovative developers of technological products and systems that will make a difference in the world.

We also want to target a variety of technological fields, such as civil engineering, mechanics, food technologies, communications, biotechnology and information. Students can thus apply themselves to creating a video game or even set up an organic vegetable garden in their community.

 

Tomorrow, we will see how the system trusts its teachers, who are also regularly assessed, not to see if they are doing the discipline well or if their students are performing well, but if they are effective conveyors of values. of the system.

 

A mini file in 3 parts:
1. Tuesday: New Zealand revolutionizes its education system
2. Wednesday: New Zealand: a simple curriculum, which allows the autonomy of each school
3. Thursday: New Zealand: an education system whose pillars are teachers

 

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About the Author

Sebastien warthttp://www.edulogia.com
Director of teaching and educational innovation at Saint-Paul College. A specialist in technological integration, Sébastien was an IT and Web optimization consultant at the FÉEP as well as an educational consultant in technology integration and a teacher at the Collège de Montréal.

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