The future of (Quebec) technologies in education

In recent months, considerable efforts have been made by all education stakeholders to integrate digital educational technologies in complementarity with traditional teaching methods. This does not mean that there are no more challenges to overcome. On the contrary!

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In recent months, considerable efforts have been made by all education stakeholders to integrate digital educational technologies in complementarity with traditional teaching methods. This does not mean that there are no more challenges to overcome. On the contrary! These were discussed during a panel at the MTL Connecte 2021 event.

It's up to Julie Pigeon, general manager of theEdteq Association, bringing together companies focused on the development of educational technologies in Quebec, that we had asked to take the reins of this round table. Jean-Guillaume Dumont, Marketing Director at Computer Druid, Yann Giroux, CEO of the firm OPLAN, and Catherine Légaré, president and founder ofAcademos, were also part of the virtual meeting.

These educational technology specialists from Quebec all agreed that it is the responsibility of all those working in the educational field to pay particular attention to the importance of integrating technologies into the school system. Everyone has a role to play. For his part, Jean-Guillaume Dumont clarified that it is important to use tools that correspond to Quebec values.

Debunking the myths

Once certain general observations had been made, the moderator of the round table launched the participants on certain very interesting avenues.

For example, some teachers still wonder what technology can bring to their teaching, how they can integrate tools into their practice. To these, Yann Giroux replies that continuing education must include the acquisition of knowledge of digital tools. However, he recognizes that at this time, given teacher exhaustion and a lack of resources, professional development is less popular.

Some also question whether disadvantaged communities have sufficient access to technologies. The gathered experts recalled that there are budgetary measures at the Quebec Ministry of Education specifically intended to promote the purchase of technologies, and even training to use them.

In addition, the panelists also mentioned the link between school and family. According to them, schools should be concerned with teaching parents how to use certain digital tools, especially those which allow parent-teacher communication. They suggested establishing links with community organizations that can offer more advanced training to parents when needed.

Made in Quebec

Catherine Légaré d'Academos reminded everyone that technologies help reduce inequalities. “500,000 students were helped during the pandemic by Alloprof, it's not nothing,” noted the young entrepreneur.

Moreover, the panelists mentioned that it is important to publicize what is being done in Quebec with regard to educational technology companies. They are, casually, more than a hundred! Many are NPOs, but they do not necessarily offer all of their products for free.

Jean-Guillaume Dumont wanted to specify that it was necessary to get out of the head that digital was essentially free. “It's a popular word in the community. Yet no one would say that a book should be free. It has to be the same for digital. "

In conclusion, Julie Pigeon appealed to everyone: “Dare to try Quebec Edtechs! ".

And you, what are your favorites among Quebec edtech companies? We want to know! Use the comments module to share them! 

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About the Author

André Magny
André Magny
For more than 30 years, André Magny has been going back and forth between journalism and teaching French to teenagers and adults alike. Freelance freelance writer for various media including Francopresse, he was also a cultural journalist at Law in Ottawa and in charge of new technologies at Soleil de Québec. He also did sports journalism in France. He has a weakness for the Francophonie, culture, sports, cuisine and politics.

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