Collaborative practices in education: positive effects for all

Collaborating is not easy. However, it is possible to learn to collaborate better, and research shows positive effects among education professionals and teachers who do so effectively. Meeting with Audrey Raynault, Ph.D. postdoctoral researcher for the Périscope Network at Laval University.

You might also like:

Add to favorites (0)

Collaborating is not easy. However, it is possible to learn to collaborate better, and research shows positive effects among education professionals and teachers who do so effectively. Meeting with Audrey Raynault, Ph.D. postdoctoral researcher for the Périscope Network at Laval University. 

Audrey Raynault, Ph.D.'s research project is intersectoral and focuses on inter-professional collaborative practices with families that promote student agency in their intervention plan in the digital age. 

In an interview, she explains that current research shows positive effects of collaboration among teachers, both at the personal level and for professional development, but also in the quality of interventions with children. In fact, teachers who collaborate effectively in trying to find solutions together to problems concerning students would be more patient and less at risk of dropping out.

Audrey Raynault explains that it is important to define what is meant by “collaborate”. Briefly, as a team, it is a matter of communicating, synchronizing and coordinating to co-create or even find together different avenues of solutions to common problems in order to then arrive at a consensus on the actions to be taken. 

The example of the health sector

As part of her work, she is particularly interested in the field of health. Indeed, we have developed a competence framework for collaborative practice in partnership with the patient. The latter has a role to play in his intervention plan and in the choice of his care. She is therefore based on this frame of reference and tries to see how certain elements could be adapted, then transferred to education., especially for the student intervention plan process.

In closing, she recalls that collaboration is a skill that can be learned, and that training to collaborate is beneficial for everyone: oneself, students, colleagues and parents.

See the full interview to find out more!

text by Audrey Miller

Some announcements

Our Network at Your Service

Use our network to spread your good news or share your projects! Write to us at info@ecolebranchee.com

You can also publish your own text!
Publicize your educational project or share your ideas via our Opinion, Testimonials or Press Releases sections! Here's how to do it!

Receive École branchée news!

Get our École branchée | Weekly News as well as the programming of our services every week!



About the Author

Stephanie Dionnehttp://ecolebranchee.com/famille
Stéphanie Dionne is director of development and partnerships, facilitator and speaker. It contributes to the influence of players in the education sector and its ecosystem. In addition, it supports parents, teachers and workers in a mentality of co-education in order to allow young people to become fulfilled citizens in the digital age.