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Distance learning: 8 tips for parents

The École branchée offers some tips to help parents deal with distance education with a little more peace of mind.

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In the context where the distance education period is prolonged in several regions of Quebec, it is important that everyone can create new benchmarks: teachers, parents and children. The École branchée offers some advice to help parents live the current period with a little more serenity.

Juggling between work (at home or not), domestic tasks, distance education and the current context creates undeniable pressure on many parents, and has been for several months. However, we must always remember that flexibility is essential to successfully reconcile our different roles. Likewise, it is not necessary to strive for perfection.

The article Supporting your child - The role of the parent in distance learning, published in the special issue of the École branchée magazine intended for parents, reminds us that it is necessary to relieve the pressure in order to approach the rest with more serenity, even if the crisis is not yet completely behind us.

We offer you an overview of the 8 tips for optimal support at home. Find the complete in the magazine, available free of charge.

1. Take care of yourself

You think about the well-being of your family members, but you don't forget yourself.

2. Free your shoulders

  • Think home learning, not home education. You don't have to take the place of the teacher.
  • Contact your child's teachers if you feel the need. #coeducation

3. Work as a team with your child 

Don't do the work for him. You can question and advise him so that he takes responsibility for his learning and guide him in the tasks to be done (depending on his age, of course!).

4. Find the right environment

Each child is unique and learns differently. Some will need a specific place in the house, with a solid organization, others will like the flexibility of place (which could also have a positive effect on their motivation).

5. Integrate your child into their work routine (especially teleworking)

Take the time to eat with your child as often as possible and plan short breaks with him.

6. Allow time to let go of your madman (or to relax)

Consider taking a moment to play, laugh and hang out with your family. And especially get out in the air!

7. Find something beautiful in each day

At the end of each day, go around the table with the family on the highlight of the day. This will help keep morale up and stay positive.

8. Encourage your child to talk to his teachers when things are not going well

He shouldn't hesitate to ask for clarification when he doesn't understand.

Find the complete article in the special issue of École branchée magazine, Well-being, a lever for learning ... even at a distance, as well as other articles related to distance education. 

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About the Author

Martine Rioux
Martine Rioux
After studying public communication, Martine worked as a journalist for various publications, before pursuing her career as an interactive communications consultant at La Capitale, a financial group, then at Québec Numérique, an organization she took over as general manager before making the jump. as political advisor in the office of the Minister for Digital Government Transformation. Today she is the online Editor-in-Chief and Special Projects Manager at l'École branchée. Her dream: that everyone has access to technology and can use it as a tool for learning and opening up to the world.

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