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"High schools should eliminate grades, exams and classes"

From September 29 to October 3, 33 representatives from ten countries around the world gathered in Waterloo, Ontario, for the Equinox Learning 2030 Summit, to imagine the high school of tomorrow. Here are some highlights of the learning model they recommend.

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From September 29 to October 3, 33 representatives from ten countries around the world gathered in Waterloo, Ontario, for the Equinox Learning 2030 Summit, to imagine the high school of tomorrow. Here are some highlights of the learning model they recommend.

“Forget about grades and exams, and don't worry if the kids in a class aren't all the same age. This is what a group of international education leaders recommends. They believe that high schools should be created that prioritize problem solving, critical thinking and innovation.

The radical recommendations of the summit Equinox Summit: Learning 2030 also propose to eliminate classes, from the 9e at the 12e year, to replace them with groups of students divided according to their abilities and fields of study.

Nowadays, it seems that the ideal class is a group of 30 students of the same level, a teacher and four walls. “But what would happen if we eliminated this model? Said Greg Butler, founder of Collaborative Impact and former senior director of global strategic partnerships in education for Microsoft. “The current model of grade levels and age is flawed. We must advance high school students, not according to their age, but rather according to theirstage where they are located. "

“Students have a very negative energy when it comes to their high school education,” said Zainab Ramahi, an undergraduate student in Knowledge Integration, a unique interdisciplinary program at the University of Waterloo. “The world needs students who are passionate and excited about school. "

Our Learning 2030 Press release contains detailed recommendations from summit participants. These recommendations cover a variety of areas, from the use of new technologies in the classroom and methods to improve student participation, to teacher training and the benefits of local school autonomy. .

On October 3, 2013, Learning 2030 participants presented the Equinox Communiqué, the plan they jointly developed to determine how to create high schools that prioritize problem solving, critical thinking, and innovation. (CNW Group/Waterloo Global Science Initiative (WGSI))

“We have been making changes for decades and we still have the same system. If you want to achieve different results, you have to rethink all the elements of the system and restructure them together. Ideas like this are already happening with success in some innovative schools around the world, ”says Jennifer Groff, MIT graduate researcher and vice-president, Learning and Curriculum Development, at. Learning Games Network.

The 33 participants at the summit Learning 2030, initiated by the Waterloo Global Science Initiative (WGSI), represented several disciplines and generations from nearly a dozen countries, including the United Kingdom, Australia, Singapore, Finland, Qatar, several African nations, the United States and Canada.

Our Learning 2030 Press release, the video of the plenary sessions of the summit and the summary of the closed meetings that gave rise to the Communicated, are available at http://wgsi.org/videovideo. A more detailed master plan of Learning 2030 will be released over the next year.

Source: press release

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About the Author

Audrey Miller
Audrey Millerhttps://ecolebranchee.com
General manager of École branchée, Audrey holds a graduate degree in educational technologies and a bachelor's degree in public communication. Member of the Order of Excellence in Education of Quebec, she is particularly interested in the professional development of teachers, information in the digital age and media education, while actively creating bridges between the actors of the educational ecosystem since 1999. She is involved these days in particular in Edteq Association and as a member of the ACELF Communications Committee. When she has free time, she is passionate about her children, his rabbits, horses, good wine and... Web programming!

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