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Ideas to celebrate Pi Day!

On March 14, we celebrate the day of Pi. This year is special since we can add the year to continue the famous sequence: 3.1416. It might not be the official date format in French, but it's a great excuse to talk about this special number in class!

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On March 14, we celebrate the day of Pi. This year is special since we can add the year to continue the famous sequence: 3.1416. It might not be the official date format in French, but it's a great excuse to talk about this special number in class!

The site Maths and ticks reminds us that: " Pi is a number that has fascinated so many scholars since antiquity. If this number is so successful, it is first of all because it conceals fascinating properties but above all because of its nature which makes it an exceptional number. Pi is a irrational number (ie it is written with an infinite number of decimals with no logical sequence). "

This same site suggests some interesting references:

- If you are more "letters" than "numbers", there is a little poem which allows you to memorize the first decimal places of Pi.

I am in Pi (in English), a fun tool to find your date of birth hidden in the decimals of Pi.

 

See also this video from Baobab Education which explains the role of Pi in calculating the circumference of the circle:

 

Homework help center instructors Kumon consider that PI Number Day is a golden opportunity to introduce young people to this number by giving them fun math challenges. For example, you could investigate the value of Pi with them, do special projects, or even party and eat πzza. Here are also 4 ideas for activities that they share with us:

 

Make a Pi inspired collage

Michael Albert is a popular New York artist who has created stunning works inspired by the pi number. He made a series of collages, one of which collects more than 777 decimal places of pi, adding a creative touch to the world of mathematics. Albert shows us that PI Number Day goes beyond math and pies (pi is pronounced the same as magpie, the word used to designate the delicious dessert). A collage will help children understand how long and interesting the irrational number pi can be.

Material:

  • Various magazines and newspapers (to cut out)
  • Glue
  • Scissors

Steps :

  1. Leaf through magazines and newspapers looking for the digits that make up the number Pi.
  2. Try to find as many numbers as possible.
  3. Create a collage by cutting out and then gluing the digits that make up the number Pi.

Organize a race to measure

Circles are all around us, and it is high time to give them some attention. This activity is perfect for having fun with math concepts. Let's find the circles around us, and measure them!

Material:

  • Soft tape measure (1 per participant)
  • Various circular objects (discs, cups, wheels, balls, etc.)
  • Lists of objects to be measured (1 list per participant)

Steps :

  1. Arrange all the objects in the room.
  2. Each participant runs from one object to another to measure its circumference and put it on their list.
  3. The first participant who measures the circumference of all the objects on the list wins the race.
  4. ADDITIONAL CHALLENGE: Have participants calculate the diameter of each object using the number Pi. The first one to succeed wins the challenge.

 

Hold a pastry competition

Although the number 3.14 is rarely useful to him, pastry is nonetheless rich in mathematics. Bake pies (apple, pumpkin, etc.) with your little ones and find out who's got a chef! You can even decorate your pies with symbols and numbers!

Material:

  • The ingredients for your favorite pie

Steps :

  1. Choose a pie recipe
  2. Follow the recipe and bake the pie
  3. Decorate the pie with numbers (3,14), equations (π = C / d) or symbols (π).
  4. Organize a tasting to elect the best pastry chef.

 

Learn how to calculate the size of a hat

The size of most hats is between 6 and 8. Ask your little ones what they think these numbers mean. Then use a tape to measure their heads (as close as possible to where the hat comes in contact with the head). Use calculators to play with the measurements. Compare the results with the sizes listed in the hats. Are your measurements related to the size of the hats? Quick hint: Experiment with different units of measure.

Material:

  • Soft tape measure
  • Calculator
  • Hats in which the size is indicated

Steps :

  1. Discuss how to get the size of a hat.
  2. Use a tape to measure participants' heads.
  3. Use a calculator to play with the measurements.
  4. Compare the results with the sizes listed in the hats.
  5. Discuss the results: Are the measurements related to the size of the hats?

Remark : The size of the hats should be related to the circumference of the head. The circumference of an adult head is usually between 53 and 64 cm (21 and 25 in). This number divided by pi gives us the corresponding hat size.

 

 

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About the Author

Audrey Miller
Audrey Millerhttps://ecolebranchee.com
General manager of École branchée, Audrey holds a graduate degree in educational technologies and a bachelor's degree in public communication. Member of the Order of Excellence in Education of Quebec, she is particularly interested in the professional development of teachers, information in the digital age and media education, while actively creating bridges between the actors of the educational ecosystem since 1999. She is involved these days in particular in Edteq Association and as a member of the ACELF Communications Committee. When she has free time, she is passionate about her children, his rabbits, horses, good wine and... Web programming!

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