ADVERTISEMENT

A study sounds the alarm on the linguistic and cognitive skills of young Francophones in Ontario

One in three kindergarten students who entered Grade 1 in Ontario were considered “vulnerable” or “at risk” in their language and cognitive skills. The majority of these students did not meet the standard in reading, writing and math by the end of grade 3

Published on :

READ THIS ARTICLE IN:

ATTENTION! The English translation is automated - Errors (sometimes hilarious!) can creep in! ;)

Mark as favorite (0)

One in three kindergarten students who entered Grade 1 in Ontario were considered "vulnerable" or "at risk" in their language and cognitive skills. The majority of these students did not meet the standard in reading, writing and math by the end of grade 3

TORONTO, June 4, 2013 / CNW / - Kindergarten teachers in Ontario have reported that nearly one in three of their students (29 %) is rated as “vulnerable” or “at risk” in their lives. linguistic and cognitive skills. These students were much less likely to meet provincial standards in reading, writing and math by the end of Grade 3e years than those who were considered "ready" or "very ready". These findings appear with others in a study on the progress of 4,676 French-language students in Ontario in the early years of school, released today by the Office de la qualité et de la responsibility en education (OQRE ).

Looking specifically at reading performance, it was found that only 40 % of students in 3e grade who had been assessed by their kindergarten teacher as "vulnerable" in their language and cognitive skills and 54 % of those who were considered "at risk" met the provincial reading standard when they were in 3e year. In comparison, 73 % of students who had been assessed as "ready" and 83 % of those who had been assessed as "very ready" in kindergarten met the provincial reading standard in 3.e year. These results demonstrate the importance of early childhood development in student learning.

“Two important lessons can be drawn from this study,” commented Marguerite Jackson, Executive Director of EQAO. First of all, it is obvious that taking care of the development of the child and of the latter as a whole constitutes a preponderant factor; second, the education system must continue to structure its programs in a way that takes into account the students and supports them at every stage of their development from the start of their schooling. "

It is important to note that not all pupils on the right track in kindergarten have achieved the standards in 3.e year. In fact, among students who were considered “ready” or “very ready” for kindergarten, 20 % did not meet the reading standard in 3.e year. At the same time, many students among those who had been assessed as "vulnerable" or "at risk" in kindergarten managed to achieve the provincial standard in 3.e year. “Obviously, a student's readiness for school in kindergarten does not guarantee or prevent later academic success,” added Ms. Jackson. "

“Overall, Ontario's education system allows most of its students to reach the standard in literacy and math, including many who were considered 'vulnerable' or 'at risk' by the end of the garden. 'children,' Ms. Jackson continued. This study reveals the importance of early childhood development indicators and demonstrates that parents and teachers alike should pay attention to them in their joint support for the progress of each child. "

The EQAO study, titled Starting Early: Teaching, Learning and Assessment - Making the Link Between Early Childhood Development and Educational Outcomes - A Detailed Portrait of Students in French-Language Schools in Ontario, reported on the progress of students who were in kindergarten between 2005 and 2008 and who were assessed by their teacher using the Early Childhood Development Measurement Instrument (EDI) , until the test in reading, writing and mathematics, when they were in 3e year, between the years 2008 and 2011.

The EDI, developed in Offord Center for Child Studies from McMaster University, is a checklist that a kindergarten teacher completes to measure a child's development and readiness for school in the following five areas: health and physical well-being, social skills, emotional maturity, linguistic and cognitive skills, and general knowledge and communication skills. EQAO's provincial tests measure students' performance against the reading, writing and math learning expectations and content of the Ontario curriculum at the end of important stages of their schooling.

About EQAO research : EQAO's research program aims to promote the use of EQAO data to improve student achievement. The agency's research projects examine the various factors that influence student achievement and the quality of education, to inform decisions made by teachers, school board administrators, parents, and others. the government.

Your comments

To comment on this topic and add your ideas, we invite you to follow us on social networks. All articles are published there and it is also possible to comment directly on Facebook, Twitter or LinkedIn.

Do you have news to share with us or would you like to publish a testimonial?

Publicize your educational project or share your ideas via our Opinion, Testimonials or Press Releases sections! Here's how to do it!

Do you like what you read?

Subscribe and receive the next 3 issues of École branchée magazine (print or digital, French or English) in addition to our exclusive online files!

Learn more >

About the Author

Communiqué
Communicated
The press releases published on Ecolebranchee.com are those received for the attention of info@ecolebranchee.com and corresponding to the editorial line. The site reserves the right not to publish all press releases.

Receive the Weekly Newsletter

Get our Info #DevProf and l'Hebdo so you don't miss out on anything new at École branchée!





You might also like: