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OECD solutions against dropping out

A plea for greater equity to counter dropping out was recently published by the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD).

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A plea for greater equity to counter dropping out was recently published by Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD).

Almost one in five students in OECD member countries does not meet the minimum level of basic knowledge. Those from disadvantaged backgrounds are twice as likely to perform poorly in school. However, the pursuit of studies is a major asset, both for the individual and for society. “Improving the skills of individuals contributes to the emergence of more democratic societies and more sustainable economies, while reducing their dependence on public support structures and their exposure to recessions. Societies with skilled populations are better prepared to face the current crisis and potential future crises, ”the document wrote.

To prevent failure and facilitate school perseverance, the OECD is proposing five measures, some of which have been the subject of debate in Quebec. The first: eliminate repetition. "Repeating a year is not only a costly practice, but also ineffective in improving school performance," the report says. There are alternative strategies, including preventing repetition by filling in gaps as they are identified during the school year; to favor automatic progression to the next level or to limit repetition to subjects or modules in which the pupil has failed while at the same time providing personalized support. "

The second: to postpone the orientation and selection of students to the second cycle of secondary school. The authors note that students "assigned to second-order streams" experience a negative impact and that this worsens inequalities, without improving average performance.

Then, we suggest that parents' choices of establishment be framed to ensure a homogeneous distribution of pupils. It is also mentioned that the funding must guarantee access to quality education structures from early childhood, in particular for disadvantaged families. Finally, the OECD suggests ensuring that general and vocational options are of equal value.

Click here to read the full report.

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About the Author

Nathalie Côté
Nathalie Cote
Nathalie is a journalist. His favorite themes are family, education, health, consumption, the environment and social phenomena. She contributes in particular to the newspaper La Presse.

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