The digital generation less expert with the computer than you think

How many parents turn to their kids when they have a computer problem, as if this generation instinctively possessed computer science? Yet this is what characterizes the experience of our young people with the computer: it is often based more on instinct than on solid knowledge.

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How many parents turn to their kids when they have a computer problem, as if this generation instinctively owns computer science? Yet this is what characterizes the experience of our young people with the computer: it is often based more on instinct than on solid knowledge.

In fact, according to new research released by Habilomedia, young Canadians don't know as much about the digital world as adults think. What's more, although they've been immersed in the field from early childhood, they still depend on their parents and teachers to help them hone their knowledge in areas like finding and verifying online information.

The results of the investigation Assess the digital literacy skills of young Canadians demonstrate that if students are actively involved in digital media, including through social media, games and video streaming, they only learn and apply digital knowledge that they consider essential to the context of their work or play . Their knowledge is therefore limited and they do not spontaneously desire to further explore the possibilities of the computer tool. When they want to know more, they consult their parents or teachers.

The study, conducted among 5,400 Canadian students, found that 53 % of girls said they had learned from their teachers how to search for information online, compared to 38 % for boys. On the other hand, parents and teachers also remain the primary sources of learning for searching for information online. Another element worth mentioning, despite the many possibilities offered on the web, 39 % of students use only a search engine to find information online and 35 % of students in the 7e at the 11e year (secondary) use the advanced search tools.

On the other hand, it appears that young people are not very aware of the ethical dimensions of Internet use. Thus, 46 % of students believe that it is okay to illegally download music, TV shows or movies. Also, 14 % of 11 studentse year (4e secondary) even indicate that they use cell phones to cheat during school exams.

In short, according to this study, despite the fact that almost all Canadian students are connected - Internet access outside of school is now universal (99 %) - digital literacy skills do not necessarily go well. self. The support of parents, like that of teachers, therefore remains very useful, even essential, for the efficient and ethical use of the computer.

 

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About the Author

Pierre Turbis
Pierre Turbis
Pierre is a journalist and columnist. He contributes to numerous publications.

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