Fifty years ago, John F. Kennedy was assassinated

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On November 22, 1963, the 35th President of the United States, John F. Kennedy (JFK), was assassinated in Dallas. Fifty years later, the tragic death of the youngest American president is still fascinating.
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November 22, 2013 marks the 50th anniversary of the assassination of John F. Kennedy by Lee Harvey Oswald. “Despite the holding of two commissions of inquiry which attempted to elucidate the facts, the idea of the plot remains and a significant number of Americans do not resign themselves to believing that their president was shot dead by a lone gunman and without clear reason. "
Source: Radio-Canada
“Because of his energy, charisma and style, but also because of his assassination in 1963, John F. Kennedy remains one of the most popular figures of the 20th century and, like Abraham Lincoln, a model President for the United States. As with President Lincoln, the abrupt demise of JFK contributed, in large part, to this image. "
Source: Wikipedia
The following activities will help you get to know this famous American president and his sad end.
 
 


Goals

At the end of the activities, the student will be able to:
- Watch the official announcement of the death of President Kennedy made on television on November 22, 1963.
- Discover the course of the day of November 22, 1963 in Dallas;
- Analyze a press article that deals with the Kennedy assassination and answer questions of comprehension;
- Discover the different theories surrounding Kennedy's death;
- Find information on Kennedy's life by consulting biographies or press articles;
- Summarize the events of November 22, 1963 in a report.
 


Suggested Activities

ACTIVITY 1: November 22, 1963

First, ask students if they know why November 22, 1963 is such a historic date. Tell them that if they ask their grandparents, they could certainly tell them exactly what they were doing on that tragic day.
To find out what tragic event happened on that date, watch this video clip in class.
Cronkite Announces the Death of JFK
Source: YouTube
Ask students to identify the event. Tell them it's CBS news anchor Walter Conkrite announcing the death of US President John F. Kennedy on the air. As they traveled the world, these images shook the planet.
To learn how President Kennedy's last day unfolded, invite students to read this article which chronicles the events.
November 22, 1963, tragic end in Dallas
Radio-Canada, November 13, 2013
Then ask students the following questions:
- When he disembarks in Dallas, why does President Kennedy tell his wife that they are arriving in "land of the mad"?
- Name two things that show that Kennedy was not very popular in Texas.
- If the weather conditions had remained the same as during the morning, do you think that the tragedy would still have taken place? Why?
- Why Connally's wife, Nelly, tells Kennedy, "You can't say people don't like you in Texas!" "?
- Did the President's route originally have to pass the Texas School Book Depository?
- True or false? After the first shot, the limousine pulled away at full speed towards the hospital.
- At what time did President Kennedy officially die? When was the announcement made by the media?
- Why did Jackie, stained with her husband's blood, refuse to change? What did she mean by her words?
- Who was Lee Harvey Oswald? Where was he arrested?
- Who was Jack Ruby? What reason did he give for murdering Oswald?
 

ACTIVITY 2: The Theories of the Kennedy Assassination

“Despite the holding of two commissions of inquiry which attempted to elucidate the facts, the idea of the plot remains and a significant number of Americans do not resign themselves to believing that their president was shot dead by a lone gunman and without clear reason. "
Source: Radio-Canada
If it is indeed a conspiracy, what could be the reasons put forward by the various actors?
For each suspect presented in the following table, students must indicate the hypotheses of associated reasons. Invite them to browse the web to explore the different theories and complete the picture.

Click on the image to enlarge.
Download the source file in Word format (.doc)
Download the file in PDF format (.pdf)

 

ACTIVITY 3: John F. Kennedy

To learn more about the man behind the myth, invite students to research information about the life of John F. Kennedy. By consulting the links in the "For more information" section, they will find information allowing them to complete the following diagram.

Click on the image to enlarge.
Download the source file in Inspiration (.isf) format
Download the file in PDF format (.pdf)

 

For further

Invite students to listen to an excerpt from the Radio-Canada report on the assassination of the American president.
John F. Kennedy assassinated
Radio-Canada Archives, November 22, 1963
Finally, ask them to record their own report on the events of November 22, 1963. They will have to put themselves in the shoes of a journalist and, with all the information gathered during the last activities, report the facts concerning the tragic death. by John F. Kennedy.
 


More about the magazine

Chronology
Radio-Canada's “The Kennedy mystery, 50 years later” file
Biography
Radio-Canada's “The Kennedy mystery, 50 years later” file
John F. Kennedy falls under the bullets
Radio-Canada file
John F. Kennedy: the man who has had his day
Radio-Canada article, November 14, 2013
John Fitzgerald Kennedy
Wikipedia article
 

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