Distance education: the gateway to the integration of digital in the classroom

In 2010, Ruben Puentedura presented a model, called SAMR, to facilitate the choice, integration and evaluation of technological tools in the classroom in order to engage students in their learning. By superimposing on it another model, that of Bloom, things take on their full meaning to facilitate the creation of meaningful tasks, allowing the attainment of higher cognitive levels. Let's take a closer look!

Published on :

Posted in:
READ THIS ARTICLE IN:

Automated English translation - (sometimes hilarious) mistakes can creep in! ;)

ADVERTISEMENT
Add to favorites (0)

In 2010, Ruben Puentedura presented a model, called SAMR, to facilitate the choice, integration and evaluation of technological tools in the classroom in order to engage students in their learning. By superimposing on it another model, that of Bloom, things take on their full meaning to facilitate the creation of meaningful tasks, allowing the attainment of higher cognitive levels. Let's take a closer look!

Who could predict that the world of education would go digital, everyone at the same time? Since the possibility of continuing distance education next September is not excluded, why not think about the integration of distance digital technology, but also when returning to class?

In an emergency, teachers went digital to communicate with their students, to provide access to content and to assess learning. For some teachers, adaptation has proven difficult. It must be said that the enabling conditions are not always met. However, some are discovering new possibilities, new applications. Others appreciate efficiency or rejoice in access to 1: 1 ratio technology. While we are discussing a possible return to normal, what will remain of these few months of all digital?

When Bloom meets Puentedura (SAMR)

In 2010, Ruben Puentedura presented a model, called SAMR, to facilitate the choice, integration and evaluation of technological tools in the classroom in order to engage students in their learning. For a more detailed explanation of the model, see this other article. Basically, this four-tier model offers a gradation of student use of technology. But it is by superimposing Bloom's model to Puentedura's model that things take on their full meaning, as shown in the diagram below. Thus, the use of digital in the classroom would facilitate the creation of engaging, meaningful and authentic tasks, thus allowing the attainment of higher cognitive levels. Let's see how this model can support distance education.

Substitution

Since March, the teaching staff has been busy finding technological means to communicate with students and provide access to course content. Students switched to digital workbooks. The tablet serves as a pencil, notebook and TNI. Cloud storage services are replacing photocopies and the good old binder. This is therefore a substitution (1st step of the SAMR model) where the student performs the same tasks as before, but using digital tools. These tasks generally lead to the first levels of Bloom's taxonomy, i.e. to memorize and of understand.

Increase

Teachers gradually familiarize themselves with new digital tools or discover new features. Self-correction of quizzes promotes autonomy. Collaborative documents allow students to critique the work of others. So there is here a increase (2nd step of the SAMR model) of the proposed tasks, a little more, compared to the tasks carried out without technology. These learning activities generally allow the student to understand and D'apply.

Thus, these first two levels of the SAMR model correspond to an enhancement of learning activities compared to the initial situation. These are the stages that are reached quite naturally in distance training. This does not mean that it can be done without difficulty. But substitution and augmentation alone do not allow the attainment of higher cognitive levels. 

Modification

At this level, technology is an integral part of the task. The latter generally uses multimedia (eg video can support writing in a blog). The productions are differentiated, unique and are not addressed only to the teacher, but to a wider or smaller audience. When you leave the classroom, the task becomes more authentic. In this way, the proposed tasks make it possible to reach higher cognitive levels, such asanalysis and theEvaluation.

Redefinition

At the last level of the SAMR model, the achievement of the requested task is inconceivable without the contribution of technology. The creation lies at the heart of this type of task. For example, a student could create a virtual reality exhibit on a specific theme to provide public access to the art. To prepare for his exhibition, he could communicate with the artists by videoconference or collaborate with young people from another class, from another country or in another language in order to compare cultural perspectives. All of this can be done without leaving your classroom ... or your living room. 

These last two levels require a transformation of the initial task through the use of technology. The task becomes more open, complex, authentic and inclusive. It also requires a transformation of the role of the teacher. From content broker, he becomes an accompanist. At this level, a learning community is usually set up to create a synergy between the learners. Thus, these last two steps of the SAMR model facilitate the achievement of higher cognitive activities. Another interesting advantage: this type of more differentiated task makes it possible to avoid plagiarism, one of the major challenges of remote evaluation. 

Some avenues for reflection

The model presented makes it possible to understand the role of digital tools in learning, whether at a distance or in the classroom. Here are some food for thought. For best results, Puentedura indicates two conditions essential to its model. First, the teacher must be motivated by improving their learning activities and not by integrating the technology for themselves. In this forced shift towards distance learning, it will therefore quickly be necessary to focus on engaging learning activities rather than on digital tools. Then, a gradual shift towards easy-to-use digital tools is necessary while avoiding needlessly complicated tools, for both the student and the teacher. 

For his part, Rhein presents a practical decision tree that allows you to situate yourself in the SAMR model. The teacher could also use this diagram to identify what is missing in their learning activity to move to the next level. 

Finally, Youki Terada, offers three simple questions to guide the choice of digital tools: 

  • How can my teaching be enhanced by the use of technology?
  • How can I stimulate the engagement of my students through the use of technology?
  • How does technology allow me to offer authentic tasks that resemble those encountered outside of school?

Of course, it is possible for the student to learn without necessarily going through the top of the Puentedura or Bloom models. Some concepts or techniques may require less complex tasks. It is up to the teacher to develop the task according to the learning targets. Ideally, the student should be able to choose the most appropriate tools to perform the proposed task. But in primary as in secondary, this choice must be skilfully guided. In addition, depending on the age and degree of autonomy of the student, tasks at higher levels may require constant support, especially at a distance. Going back already seems inconceivable. When they return to class, the students and teachers will have radically changed their practices. Since necessity creates need, isn't this compulsory passage through distance education an opportunity to be seized to really integrate digital technology into the classroom? This is a great opportunity to think about it and the SAMR model constitutes a complementary tool to the Reference framework for digital competence to reflect on the place of digital in learning.

Your comments about this article

To comment on this article and add your ideas, we invite you to follow us on social networks. All articles are published there and it is possible to comment directly on Facebook, Twitter or LinkedIn.

Do you have news to share with us or would you like to publish a testimonial?

Publicize your educational project or share your ideas via our Opinion, Testimonials or Press Releases sections! Here's how to do it!

Do you like what you read?

Subscribe and receive the next 3 issues of École branchée magazine (print or digital, French or English) in addition to our exclusive online files!

Learn more >

About the Author

Phylippe Laurendeau
Phylippe laurendeau
For 25 years, the biologist, teacher, educational advisor and now technopedagogue has accumulated a rich and diversified experience in education. In her texts, Phylippe uses her background and her passion for digital resources, efficient practices and distance learning.

Receive the Weekly Newsletter

Get our Info #DevProf and l'Hebdo so you don't miss anything new!





You might also like: